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View Full Version : 1991 Newell Coach With Undercarriage Rust How to Prevent Further Rusting


Bus Hunter
11-27-2012, 06:09 PM
When looking under this used 1991 Newell Coach, I saw some rust here and there on nothing particular. I am in the middle of making a deal and want to know which lubricant you recommend to spray these areas with to inhibit the rust that is there and prevent further rusting...Thanks for your replies and safe miles.

MrE
11-27-2012, 08:00 PM
Rust is like cancer, it needs to be removed completely to stop the spread. I would sand/soda/glass/etc. blast the rust off, prime the area and cover with an appropriate paint. You can pick up an air blast gun for as little as $15 at Harbor Freight.

86loco
11-27-2012, 09:40 PM
Jon is correct. We have looked at so many conversions and Newells, with a few having rust and of course the older they were the more prominent rust was. Corrosion is another problem on the aluminum to watch for. Lubricants are only going to stop things temporary. You have to stop the rust from continuing.

Newell Attack
11-27-2012, 09:43 PM
Rust is extremely difficult to stop, but it can be controlled. Rust on major chassis parts (i.e., frame rails) doesn't concern me as much as rust on fasteners (nuts/bolts/etc)which is a concern for obvious reasons. I recommend wire-brushing or chipping away as much rust as possible and then brushing on a rust neutralizing product There are lots of products out there, doubtless you will get many more recommendations.

HoosierDaddy
11-27-2012, 11:26 PM
Rust is extremely difficult to stop, but it can be controlled. Rust on major chassis parts (i.e., frame rails) doesn't concern me as much as rust on fasteners (nuts/bolts/etc)which is a concern for obvious reasons. I recommend wire-brushing or chipping away as much rust as possible and then brushing on a rust neutralizing product There are lots of products out there, doubtless you will get many more recommendations.

I have tried several solutions to this problem. Undersides get pummelled by stones and other debris. Any coating that is not self-healing will eventually allow moisture to penetrate the metal. My most recent project ( an Imperial car trailer) I wire brushed all loose corrosion off, sprayed it with Eastwood Rust Converter
Eastwood Rust Converter Aerosol - Remove Rust - Rust Converter Paint - Eastwood (http://www.eastwood.com/ew-rust-converter-new-formula-aerosol.html)
, and then top coated with Fluid Film. Fluid Film stays somewhat moist so it will self heal when abraided but will eventually wear off and need recoating.
Fluid Film Rust Protection (http://www.kellsportproducts.com/)

Dean

MrE
11-28-2012, 12:08 AM
Dean, I've never heard of or tried either product but judging by your signature line and your testimony they are definitely now on my list of rust fighters. Thank you!

jdaniel
11-28-2012, 12:59 AM
I recently looked at an 04 on the west coast that originally came from Florida. When you opened the outside compartments, all the nuts and bolts were rusted. The aluminum seams around the coach had corrosion that was bubbling up the paint. The outside water controls all had pitting and corrosion on them. The inside was very nice and the miles were good but I couldn't shell out that kind of money and come home with a headache. I felt like I would be working on that problem from now on and at resell time I was going to take a hit. I passed!

Neweller
11-28-2012, 05:21 AM
I had a coach that spent a lot of time down in Florida for a few years and it too had a considerable amount of rust. As Dean was mentioning about trapping the moisture, this is what I found on this particular coach between the insulating foam and the sheet metal on the bottom side. The foam was trapping a lot of water. I know the classic body's have problems with water getting into the basement areas from seams and doors. Something important on these is to make sure the drip rails are sealed well.

Raymond N Priscilla Miller
11-28-2012, 02:15 PM
I have had headaches with rust in my life and it's a royal pain in the butt! It's amazing how fast it spreads. If you take care of it before it gets worse with the different suggestions offered here you should be alright.

Viva Las Vegas JDR
11-28-2012, 05:37 PM
I suppose it depends on what the "nothing particular" is. Just about anything can be sprayed with regular rubberized undercoating.


Check this out:

Mascoat Transportation Thermal Insulation - Auto Insulation : Mascoat (http://www.mascoat.com/automotive-thermal-insulation.html)

Jon ghiles
11-28-2012, 05:40 PM
You have good answers so far, and my reply might not be what you are looking for, but if you drive your motor home on Winter roads or park it close to salty air shorelines, you need to spray salt terminator on your chassis. It will protect your chassis from road salt while leaving a protective sheen, and when you spray it on after driving on those type roads, it dissolves and NEUTRALIZES the salt. Remember....water alone will NOT wash away the road salt.